Wednesday, April 6, 2022

Why Autism Acceptance Is Preferred Over Autism Awareness

Before I start, I always like to mention that my son has autism. I would never speak for a community unless I had personal experience. My son is incredible and I love how his mind works. If I want to know if an outfit looks good on me, I ask him because he's blunt. It's tough for him to lie which I find endearing most of the time. Unless he points out all my gray hairs. 


April has been known as Autism Awareness Month in the past. I even called it that. But then I started seeing posts from Actually Autistic people stating that they didn't like the month being referred to as Autism Awareness Month. They would prefer it would be Autism Acceptance Month. Why?

Well. After I did my research and asked Tommy, I realized it made sense. Of course it's wonderful to be AWARE of autism. But it's better to ACCEPT Autism. Sadly, many people don't take the time to do this. If they see someone stimming or having a meltdown in public, they might scowl and assume that person is a brat or being difficult. The autism community needs others to accept who they are.



Accepting people with autism means:


Accepting that stimming happens in public. I know my son will rock and flick his fingers sometimes. Do not stare. 

Accepting that autistic people might do things differently than you. For example, my son might not understand that not everyone wants to continue talking about cumulonimbus clouds. 

Acceping that not everyone with autism drives. This isn't weird. Don't make them feel bad for not driving. 

Accepting that they can be incredibly blunt and honest. Some of the things they say will NOT be PC. 

Accepting that sometimes they can get overwhelmed and will have to walk away suddenly. 





ACCEPTING. It sounds like such an easy concept but so many think awareness is enough. 

This month and every month after, please accept autistic people for exactly who they are.



You'll probably find that they're some of the best folks you'll ever meet. 

19 comments:

  1. I appreciate this change in language and meaning!

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  2. I love everything about this. My daughter has autism. And acceptance is definitely important. I love that you wrote not everyone wants to talk about clouds. My daughter always talks about her favorite YouTuber and doesn’t realize everyone else doesn’t always know who that is. And she is great for a blunt honest opinion about my outfits.

    Tommy is a great person and I love how reading you throughout the years has given me so much insight. I love how you encourage him and how he is truly himself.

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  3. I love the elf costume! He sounds like a fun person to hang out with.

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  4. This was such a great read. I've always thought that awareness and acceptance went hand in hand, but I can see the illustration of the difference here.

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  5. Understanding the differences of awareness and acceptance can go a long way in helping people realize how their actions or even lack of actions effect the situation differently.

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  6. I love this post! I've seen and heard so many misconceptions about autism and it would be nice if everyone could learn more about it and be accepting!

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  7. I love this post. It is good to be "aware" but accepting is far better. You have a wonderful son and he is very fortunate to have you as a mom.

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  8. Thank you for this post. I love it. A good friend of mine has an autistic child. I loved sitting and "chatting" with him. He taught me a lot about just being a human being to other human beings.

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  9. Good points for consideration and implementation! Thanks for the food for thought. I'll be sharing with my education peeps.

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  10. It helps to be aware of the condition in order to know about it and accept it. We hadn't come across any autistic children until my son joined his school and had an autistic boy in his class. We are far more clued up now.

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  11. I really love this! I have so many family members with Autism. You have such a great post here. I think everyone needs to accept everyone for who they are.

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  12. I love that autistic people are different. I love to know people that are interesting and special!

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  13. Totally agree with you on this! I am all for people being accepting and really making an effort to understand autism.

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  14. I couldn't agree with this more. I never thought about it until I read your post. We need to accept!

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  15. I definitely agree with you, I wouldn't want to change what makes someone unique

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  16. I couldn't agree more! this is so important to share! thanks for this

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  17. YES! Couldn't agree more!! I know so many friends who have struggled with their kids being accepted by friends and colleagues.

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  18. Couldn't agree more. Awareness of autism must be at an all time high but I think many don't know what to expect or how to help.

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  19. My grandfather had autism and started losing his hearing quite early. Doctors said that this is normal, although everything that I found on the Internet was not connected. These illnesses weren't supposed to affect each other, but in his case they did. I'm not sure if autism caused the hearing loss because I don't have a medical background, but I think it may have affected it. My therapist recommended that I read reviews at https://nano-hearing-aids.pissedconsumer.com/review.html to choose the best hearing aids for my grandfather. I looked at the reviews and saw a lot of positive ones among them, and we ordered an individual hearing aid for him according to his needs and the shape of his ear.

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Thanks for the comment!

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