Sunday, October 15, 2017

This Is Autism

What's it like having Autism? I'm not really sure, but I've lived with someone who has Autism for 15 years now and I've learned a few things along the way.







This is Autism.


While most kids were drawing pictures of their families, my son drew photos of power lines.




This is Autism.



My son has a wedge in his mattress because he crashes several times a night. It helps calm him down. He doesn't mind sleeping on the wedge but we do have to replace the mattress every 2-3 years because eventually the springs will start popping through.




This is Autism.



When you don't know why your son won't stop crying. Before I knew he had autism, I didn't understand why he completely flipped out while at the store. Nothing I could do could calm him down. He screamed at the top of his lungs, his face was bright red, and of course I was getting judgmental looks. It turns out he got upset because of a flickering florescent light overhead. He said it felt like it was poking his eyes out.




This is Autism.


Even if you want a hug from him, he won't always comply. Sometimes he cannot be touched. Sometimes he allows the hug, but his arms remain at his sides. He knows that contact is important to you, so he'll tolerate it because he wants so much to please.




This is Autism.



My son never uses urinals. He finds it strange to be around people, doing a personal thing, so he always gets a stall.



This is Autism.



While some kids can easily make friends, those with Autism might struggle. They don't always comprehend sarcasm and don't understand why people don't just say what they mean. And what is UP with odd phrases like, "This is sick!" To Tommy, sick conjures up images of throwing up and lying in bed, so how can it possibly mean cool? When he was younger he didn't understand why kids called each other "dogs." I explained to him that it was "dawg," and it was a term of endearment. "But why? That's weird. If someone called me dog, I'd correct them and say no, I'm a human boy."




My son has Autism, so he does things a little differently. But it's okay, because it reminds me that not every kid is the same. Even kids with Autism have their various quirks. While some easily have friends, others struggle to make a social connection. So be patient with them. You'll probably learn a lot. (Seriously though. My son is obsessed with the weather and can talk your ear off about the various clouds. He loves to take photos of them.)





Do you know someone with Autism?

91 comments:

  1. I have learned so much from Elias. He is a "High Function Kid" but still, everything is so different with him. I love my silly goose!

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  2. Thanks for sharing these points about autism. I believe kids have each own traits and likes. Let them enjoy the world because its beautiful.

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  3. I haven't known anyone with autism, but I really appreciate you sharing this with us. I wonder how you managed when you didn't know he had autism. But now that you're aware, I'm sure you can manage situations & love him even more.

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  4. I don't know anyone with Autism personally.But,I've read about life stories through the blogs.It seems Autism kids need more attention.And I can see how thoughtful you are about your kid...

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  5. I had a friend who daughter had autism and I realised more attention is needed and patience. You are a good mother to your child and I hope you get all the strength you need to raise him as sometimes it can be quiet difficult.

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  6. Thank for a post that makes us understand better how a person with autism can behave. Not every autism are the same but this show that what might be clear for us for them its not and we have to stop judging people because we dont know the story behind it!

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  7. Thankyou for this educational post, I do not personally know someone with autism but this has helped me to become more understanding of what it means to be autistic. You are an exceptional mother, well done.

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  8. My youngest has ADHD, so we were in early intervention with a couple of kids who had autism. We've known a few others through school over the years.

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  9. This is an informative post! My brother is a meteorologist, maybe Tommy will become one too!

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  10. I've known a few families with children with autism, but no one close to me. This post offered a lot of insight. Thanks for sharing

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  11. I have to admit I don't personally know anyone with autism, though I know people online who have kids with it, it seems like such a hard thing for everyone to go through and so misunderstood by many.

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  12. A wonderful post. You gave simple but specific features about autism. You must love your child so much. This sharing trully give me a lot of infomation about autism.

    Thank you so much for sharing!

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  13. I think it is great you are educating people on autism. Every child is different and never fits a mold. Wonderful insight on day to day experiences.

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  14. There's always something special about each kid. I love how you shared this. It helps me better understand my nephew who was diagnosed with autism at age 5. He's now 8 years old and isn't really speaking. We're all very concerned.

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  15. Thank you for sharing something so difficult to grasp but in such a wonderful way! I think each kid is special autism or not and yours is a wonderful creature!

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    1. I totally agree with this, it has helped me try and understand such a complex issue in a different light.

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  16. I have known someone with autism but I was really young so I don't really remember. And there is a wide spectrum so it's also hard to give a definition. I know some aspects of autism but not all the ones you described.

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  17. My oldest has autism and it can be so difficult at times. It's funny you mention the urinals, my daughter HATES automatic flush toilets. She's gotten better, but it's tough for her.

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  18. One of my sons best friends has autism and it took some getting used to for my son - but now that he's grown up with him a bit, he does understand how little things are just different for them. My son has his own little quirks as well, but I think growing up with a close friend has opened his eyes to realize that everyone is different and it's taught him patience and compassion

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  19. My niece has autism and she has struggled especially in the social world. She finally found something she loves and she studies everything she can about that subject. It looks like you seemed understand your son very well. It actually is explained well in this post and I really love that you shared it.

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  20. I have had a little experience with kids with autism but not a lot of the day to day. You explained your son so well and I'd love to learn about clouds from him.

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  21. I appreciate this so so much! There is only so much you can read about autism but learning from a parent is the best way to be educated.

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  22. I have learnt a lot over the last few months reading about autism but its helpful to read from someone who knows or experiences it

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  23. This is such a touching article. Thank you for sharing and thank you for having the love, patience, and empathy to care for an Autistic child.

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  24. My 15 year old grandson is autistic and mostly non-verbal. He is very smart and a whiz on the computer.

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  25. I don't know anyone who has Austism. I appreciate that shared a little of your son's life with us.

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  26. My friend's kid has autism and I have learned a lot about it through them. Thank you for sharing a glimpse into your life and experiences through this blog.

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  27. This is a very sweet post! It really helps me understand more of what it's like to raise a child who has autism.

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  28. Thank you for sharing such a personal side of your sons journey wiht Autism. Appreciating the world from their view is crucial.

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  29. My friends little girl is 6 and non verbal. She was diagnosed with Autism at 3 years old. She may not be able to talk but she definitely has her own unique way of communicating.

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  30. I loved how your write this and really put a face to it. He’s adorable and I appreciate your sharing!!

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  31. Thanks so much for sharing your experience with autism. Your son is adorable! My cousin was recently diagnosed with autism and he also struggles with understanding sarcasm.

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  32. You know I am really inspired by you. You know it takes courage to write something about it and to tackle it everyday. Your boy is wonderful and it can be treated with proper guidance and care.

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  33. Wow, such an eye opening read for those of us that don't have children with Autism. Thank you so much for sharing your world.

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  34. Very useful information, great to see awareness being spread about more and more experiences for people with varying conditions.

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  35. I completely understand. My foster sister has Williams and autism and she hates loud noises, dislikes change and has limited verbal vocabulary. But she is happy go lucky x

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  36. Thanks for sharing your story about your son and autism. It is nice for you to share this with your readers so we can have an insight of how autism can affect how a child reacts to ordinary things.

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  37. I do not know anyone with autism, but I appreciate your candid information. It is so neccessary to create awareness.

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  38. Wow! I didn't know most of these! I knew a little about the drawing, I've seen some incredibly intricate and stunning drawings that were done by people on the Autism Spectrum and they are just beautiful.

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  39. I can relate to you. It has to be very difficult at times. I have a good friend whose son is now 19 and has autism. He doesn't even know you are in the room. It is so difficult in their situation and I know it can be for many. You are doing a great job.:)

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  40. Thanks for sharing this with us, I really didn't know much about autism until after reading your post. It has really enlightened me and will help me relate better with children and adults alike who have autism.

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  41. The part where you explained how he tolerates hugs because he understands contact is important to you even though he does not necessarily feels that way was honestly the part that made my eyes water.

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  42. You need to keep teaching people. This is so touching to see how you handle all of this.

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  43. Yes, I do know people with Autism! Tommy may be one of my favorites, even though we've never "met."
    I started watching The Good Doctor. I like it!

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  44. Yes, as a teacher I have taught several autistic children. They have such a special place in my heart.

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  45. Autism is definitely a strange thing to live with. My daughter is high functioning. You would never think so by looking at her and the fact that she loves being around people, but when you go to talk to her, she doesn’t respond the way she should... and that’s when we start having issues with other people because she doesn’t communicate like “everyone else”. With autism being a more and more of a common thing, you would think people would be more open and accepting. I feel the world definitely needs more awareness since most people are so scared of it like it’s some deadly disease they can catch -_- love that you’re trying to make people more aware:):)

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  46. This was such an insightful post. I always knew that people with autism were sensitive to certain things or often very straightforward. I have never really met anyone that had it though.

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  47. Aww.. But it's a beautiful journey though. I LOVE how you say "he does things different and that is ok". BINGO! That' is RIGHT mama'bear.

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  48. I really love this post! I have known many children with autism, and many people don't understand and know why they do things "differently". I love how you said he does and that's okay, because it is! Every child is unique in their own way and that's what makes them extraordinary!

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  49. This is very encouraging for other moms who are in the same situation. I enjoyed reading it.

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  50. This is very informative, but I'm sure it's only the surface. Thank you for this. It made me learn a lot more about it!

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  51. There is no one way to look at autism. Everyone has different quirks. Thanks for shining a little light into your sons life. Such a sweet kid!

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  52. The little girl across the street has autism. She comes over to play occasionally. It did take some time to learn more about her world, but I'm happy to say that once we got it down, communication with her is much easier!

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  53. Through your words, true, sincere and excited, you allow us to take a trip to this world that we don't all know so closely. And you do it without false filters, but with only that of love.

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  54. As I have mentioned, my husband has autism. He is very high functioning so a lot of people wouldn't necessarily notice off the bat, but I 100% do because well, I am with him 24/7. My husband has a lot of triggers but he knows how to cope with them in public. The hug thing Is also 100% accurate as he HATES being touched. HATES IT. And get psychically repulsed if anyone touches him. HE has to be the one to initiate touch - but he only touches me. I don't think that this is any sort of handicap though, it just adds to our already quirky relationship and I love him for it.

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  55. Your son is adorable. I'm sure that there are aspects of his autism that are very difficult, but it's obvious that you adore him.

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  56. When I was in public school, I was drawn to my students with autism. I wanted to know about them and what they were like. One kid said I was too nosy, another just looked at me when I asked questions. One little girl would hold my hand but not talk to me. The thing was, when they were stressed at school, many would ask to see me. We'd sit together. My statement was, if you have something to tell me that I should know, great, tell me when you are ready. If you don't want to tell me, you can stay here until you are ready to go back to class. When you are ready, please tell me you are leaving. It seemed to work, and I was always honored when a student would ask to see me.

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  57. My cousin son has autism I remember once teacher told to his class to draw a bathroom and he did it but in a different way you could see canalisation and all pipes but not toilet, sink etc

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  58. Thank you for giving a glimpse of what life is like. I do know someone with Autism.

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  59. I've had a few students with Autism and I can see some similarities when it comes to them and your son. However, it's wonderful to get to know it from a mother's perspective, too. :)

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  60. Thank you for sharing this post. The importance and openness it expresses is beautiful.

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  61. Thank you for sharing about your son. It is something important for everyone to understand.

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  62. I don't know what to say except THANK YOU FOR EDUCATING ME ABOUT AUTISM! Great information.

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  63. Your son has autism, but autism doesn't have him. I can see bits of his personality shine through loud and clear.

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  64. I haven't lived with anyone with autism but I've worked with kiddos who have autism back in 2006-2010. I absolutely loved it and the kid/families I met a long the way. All the different obsessions were always fascinating to me.

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  65. A few people suggested to me that my oldest was on the spectrum, but our doctor did not think so, and she was never evaluated. I see some similarities between Tommy and my child. I love that Tommy is so open and willing to discuss things with you. Your relationship is wonderful.

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  66. I have not known someone with autism, but I genuinely appreciate everything that you shared. I see that communication, patience, and understanding are important.

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  67. Your little boy is wonderful! I know many with autism but I know they're really more than we can see with our naked eyes. Thank you for sharing your views about Autism.

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  68. I do know one person whose son has autism. It makes me mad to see people judge them who have no idea or sometimes they do know but they don't care. They judge anyway. Sometimes people can be crappy. But then I see other people who treat them well in spite of the issues.

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  69. I do have any experience with people both young and old in any state of autistic spectrum. this post was an interesting read to me, now I understand it a lot better

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  70. Thank you for sharing this. One of my good friends has Autism and she's taught me so much about the condition. I was clueless prior to that. This post has also been so informative.

    I hope you're all managing to stay safe. Sending much love xx

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  71. A lot of us are not aware about the behavior of someone who has autism. This post gives us a clear picture of it. Thank you for sharing this awareness. Always, keep safe!

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  72. Thank you so much for sharing this. I feel like some people don't really understand autism and that can be hard for people that have it. I have a coworker who is autistic and I know certain clients don't appreciate who he is, which makes me sad because he's an amazing person.

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  73. I don't personally know someone with autism so I didn't know these things. Glad you're raising awareness about it. And, I'm impressed with that drawing. - LYNNDEE

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  74. I have heard about kids crashing their heads in their beds to comfort them. I can imagine that would be soothing to do something repetitive.

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  75. I don't know anyone with autism but i've heard a lot of stories that make me feel sad as a mother.btw your son is adorable

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  76. I don't know anyone with Autism, but I remember when for the first time we made the Autism test when my daughter was two years old. I remember very clear those questions. My daughter has not Autism, but like all the children - she is different.

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  77. Thank you for sharing this and educating us. Your son is adorable!

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  78. I know a bit about Autism. I have two nieces and one nephew who are autistic. I know it can be tough at times. I've babysat for them many times, but they're wonderful kids.

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  79. Thanks for this post. Autism can take so many faces that it is hard to give a definition or know what it would look like so it is great to raise awareness of all the different things that are autism.

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  80. Thank you for sharing. I don't have anyone close to me personally with autism, so hearing your first-hand experiences is really eye-opening.

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  81. What a great article Amber. Thanks so much for sharing your story and about your son and Autism. I don't know anyone personally that has Autism, but I had a portraits studio for 16 years and worked with many autistic children. The parents always let me know, but we never seemed to have any issues at all. Thank you for a peak into what life is like for you.

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  82. This hit home for me. I have an 8 year old with Autism. Our days are unpredictable as you know. Thank you for sharing your story.

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  83. I love this! As a teacher, who completed her masters in adapted physical education and worked with a wide range of students, I love this post. It is simple in its message and effective! Keep being an awesome mama.

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  84. We have friends who have autistic children, but I don't have a lot of experience or closeness with anyone who is autistic. It is always good to learn more!

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  85. Thanks for sharing. I knew some of these things but not all. It must be such a challenge for the person with autism and their loved ones.

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  86. Thanks for sharing awareness! Different doesn't mean bad.

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  87. Honestly, I don't blame your son about the Urinals. I was never completely comfortable using them either. I know Autism can be such a challenge. Just remember, you are doing an amazing job.

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  88. my bonus daughter has autism. Thankfully I have taught autistic students in the past so I kind of knew what I was dealing with when she came into my life. But every kid is different. it is always nice to know that we are not alone when dealing with autism.

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  89. Very informative as I don't know anyone with autism. Love his fascinating with clouds. That could be a potential career path. Thanks for sharing

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